This article explains how I successfully translated Japanese Ryu-book to Korean even though I am not well familiar with Japanese. I used VisualTran Mate (http://en.visualtran.com/?type=en) software as a translation helper tool.


Ryu is a SDN controller which is written in Python. The Ryu-book (http://osrg.github.io/ryu/resources.html) explains how to develop SDN applications using Ryu controller with a very illustrative manner. And, on April, I found that all the texts and book publishing tools are uploaded to Github repository (https://github.com/osrg/ryu-book). I also found that all the translation procedures are fulfilled by git commits. This is why I finally decided to translate that book to Korean. I really wanted help more Korean people to see this illustrative book.



At the first time, I have no privileges on editing osrg/ryu-book git repository. So, I forked that repository. After commiting my translation results to my forked repository, then I can make a pull request to this original repository. The bottom figure shows my forked repository for ryu-book.



To do translations on my computer using this data, I needed to retrieve that source to my computer. I executed 'git' command and cloned that forked repository to my computer.



The original Japanese texts are written as *.rst files. Those files are fully text files with UTF-8 format. 



VisualTran Mate program supports MS word (*.doc, *.docx) files, but text files can be open very well in MS word. So, I opened rst files in MS word. The bottom figure shows 'rest_api.rst' file opened from my MS word program.



You can find that VisualTran Mate ribbon menu is loaded in MS word. When I click a VisualTran Mate  icon, that program is executed and automatically detects a source language (Japanese) and a target language (Korean, because I am using Korean WIndows). 



The bottom figure shows machine-translating using Microsoft Bing. VisualTran Mate supports machine-translation using Microsoft Bing.



However, the translation quality of machine-translation results is not good enough to liberally read in Korean, although it is said that the accuracy of Japanese->Korean translation is about 95%. Sometimes there are missing spaces, and some words are not proper on contexts. For me, I have three advantages for better translation. 


 1) Although I am not good at Japanese, I can read Katakana characters. Japanese Katakana characters are used to write foreign words such as 'flow table' and 'link aggregation'.


 2) There is an English edition of ryu-book (http://osrg.github.io/ryu-book/en/html/). When I do not understand some sentences, I find corresponding English sentences, understand what those sentences mean, and reflect my understanding to Korean sentences.


 3) VisualTran Mate is a good tool which shows original sentences, machine-translated sentences, and my translating sentences simultaneously. This is very powerful because without this help, I might usually press several ALT+TABs, find corresponding sentences displayed in different programs, and compare those sentences.



Finally, I completed my translation, pulled my translation results to the original ryu-book repository, and now my translation results are publicly available.

 pdfmobiepubhtml


First, I would like to very appreciate Ryu-book team. The people in Ryu-book team first made Japanese ryu-book, and then English ryu-book. Without those books, I could not translate well to Korean. Moreover, their GitHub repository is very powerful for collaborating translations with open-source mind. And also, thank you so much for VisualTran Mate, which minimized my lots of manual stuff related to that translation.

Posted by Ian Y.

Previously, many developers and engineers needed to add OpenFlow dissector to WireShark to analyze OpenFlow protocol packets in WireShark. It was so difficult stuff, because we needed to match the version of OpenFlow dissector and the version of Wireshark.


According to Wireshark wiki page (http://wiki.wireshark.org/OpenFlow), OpenFlow dissector will be available on Wireshark 1.12.0, and this version was released as 'Stable Release' on 31 July, 2014.


I have downloaded this stable release version and checked that this version well supports both OpenFlow 1.0 & 1.3!


Just download from Wireshark homepage (https://www.wireshark.org/download.html)and install the latest stable release of Wireshark.

After installation, you can see that your Wireshark supports OpenFlow 1.0, 1.3 and 1.4.


I have downloaded & installed Wireshark 1.12.0 on my Windows computer and it worked very well!


[Menu: Supported Protocols]


[Parts from supported protocols]


Here are some screenshots which show that OpenFlow 1.0 & 1.3 filters work very well:


[OpenFlow 1.0: openflow_v1]


[OpenFlow 1.3: openflow_v4]



Posted by Ian Y.

I have finished the draft translation of "RYU SDN Framework", written in Japanese & English.


HTML: http://ianychoi.github.io/ryu-book/ko/html/

PDF: http://ianychoi.github.io/ryu-book/ko/Ryubook.pdf


This book was published in Japanese first, on the early of this year

(http://osrg.github.io/ryu-book/ja/html/)

and after several months, the English edition of this book was also published

(http://osrg.github.io/ryu-book/en/html/).


I'm not good at Japanese, but I mainly used Google translator (http://translate.google.com).

So please give me feedback through github (https://github.com/ianychoi/ryu-book/).


Currently, the PDF edition has line-feed problems.

I think it is because of the conflict between ko.tex & listings packages used in Latex,

but it is a little bit difficult for me to solve this problem..


I hope that more Korean developers will read this book and contribute to SDN worlds!


Note: Ryu is a SDN controller written by Python, and supports various OpenFlow versions: 1.0, 1.2, 1.3 and 1.4.



Posted by Ian Y.